Search

Drs, Michel Fancelli and Jacques Hebert, dentists, Longueuil, Quebec, Canada

Centre Dentaire Fancelli

Place Hérelle
560 Chemin de Chambly, Suite 100
Longueuil, Qc. J4H 3L8

Website: http://www.centredentairefancelli.ca/

Telephone
450 670-0021
514 990-1930

Fax
450 679-3163
Email
mfancelli@bellnet.ca

hebertj@bellnet.ca

 

Dr. Michel Fancelli

After graduating from McGill University in 1981, Dr. Fancelli completed
a multidisciplinary residency at the Montreal Children's Hospital. He has
been practicing in Longueuil since 1984. He opened a new state of the art, high technology office in 2002 .

Dr. Fancelli has a particular interest in cosmetic dentistry, implantology, the treatment of occlusal and temporomandibular joint dysfunction, sleep disorders, orthodontics as well as laser dentistry.

 Dr. Fancelli is a graduate of the prestigious Dawson Institute for Advanced Dental Studies in Florida and participates in numerous continuing education courses all over North America and Europe to study with leaders in there respected fields. He completed a residency program at the TMJ and Sleep Therapy Research, an advance training on the management of temporomandibular joint and sleep disorders.

Dr. Fancelli is a member of the World Clinical Laser Institute (WCLI), the International Team for Implantology (ITI), the Academy of Clinical Sleep Disorder Discipline (ACSDD), the American Academy of Craniofacial Pain (AACP), the Association des Chirurgiens Dentistes du Québec (ACDQ) and the Quebec Order of Dentists (ODQ). He serves as Quebec Representative and Officer on the Executive Committee and is a member of the Program Committee of the Canadian Chapter of the American Academy of Craniofacial Pain (AACP-Can Chapt). 

Dr. Jacques Hébert

Dr Hebert graduated from Laval University in Québec City in 1981. He then completed a multidisciplinary residency program at the Jewish General Hospital in Montreal the following year. 

Dr. Hebert's areas of expertise are the treatment of jaw joint, chronic pain and sleep disorders, orthodontics, cosmetic dentistry and rehabilitation, implantology and laser dentistry.

 He is also a graduate of the prestigious Dawson Institute for Advanced Dental Studies in Florida. He has traveled all over North America and Europe to study with the leaders in Chronic Head and Neck Pain, Temporomandibular Dysfunction (TMD), Orthodontics and Sleep Breathing Disorders which include snoring and sleep apnea. 

Dr.Hébert completed a residency program at the TMJ and Sleep Therapy Research, an advance training on the management of temporomandibular joint and sleep disorders. He joined the Centre Dentaire Fancelli team in 2004 after 21 years of private practice in Montreal. 

 Dr. Hebert is a member of the American Academy of Craniofacial Pain (AACP), the Academy of Clinical Sleep Disorder Discipline (ACSDD), the International Team for Implantology (ITI), the World Clinical Laser Institute (WCLI), , the Association des Chirurgiens Dentistes du Québec (ACDQ) and the Quebec Order of Dentists (ODQ). In addition, he serve as Officer and Quebec Representative on the executive committee as well as a member of the Program Committee of the Canadian Chapter of the American Academy of Craniofacial Pain (AACP- Can Chapt). 

Thursday
Jul302015

Mouth Breathing, Dentist Dr. Jacques Hébert, Longueil, Montreal, Canada

As Dr. Jacques Hébert explains, breathing through one’s nose is important for several reasons. It regulates the rate of respiration, slowing down the breathing rate and making people use more of their lung capacity. This helps people absorb more oxygen from the air. Nose breathing helps promote good head posture.

However, Dr. Hébert says, mouth breathing has just the opposite effects. Mouth breathers breathe faster and absorb less oxygen. They use less of their lungs, and their heads move forward, creating bad posture and, perhaps, back problems.

Over time, Dr. Hébert says, mouth breathing will have dental consequences. Mouth breathing results in a dry mouth, and that can cause bad breath, tooth decay, and gingivitis. A more serious issue is that mouth breathing is usually associated with snoring, and snoring is usually associate with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).

Mouth breathing is an even worse problem in children, Dr. Hébert explains. Mouth breathing in children can lead to a host of problems, including long faces, small chins, and crooked teeth. Also, because the air taken in is not being filtered through the nose, a child’s tonsils can get enlarged. That can cause breathing problems at night, and that can cause children to be sleepy during the day, performing poorly in school, and possibly behavioral problems.

So any parent who notices that a child is breathing through the mouth while the child is at rest should come in for a consultation with the dentist as soon as possible. Dr. Hébert says that he will start a child as early as age five with an appliance to help retrain the musculature of the face. The idea is to get the child breathing normally through the nose. The treatment for an adult mouth breather is similar, but the aim is to get the patient’s health back to an optimal level.

Dr. Jacques Hébert, of Centre Dentaire Fancelli near Montreal in Longueuil, Quebec, Canada, graduated from Laval University in Quebec City in 1981, Dr. Jacques Hébert is a multidisciplinary residency at the Jewish General Hospital in Montreal the following year. His areas of predilection are the joint treatment, cosmetic dentistry and implantology and laser treatments. Dr. Hébert is a graduate of the prestigious Institute for Advanced Dental Dawson Studies in Florida. Sleep Better TV is a featured network of Sequence Media Group.

Thursday
Jul302015

Snoring, Dentist Dr. Jacques Hébert, Longueil, Montreal, Canada

Snoring is a common problem, especially among adults, and is sometimes the subject of jokes. However, as Dr. Jacques Hébert explains in this report, snoring can be a serious problem, but it is treatable.

Most people don’t think of snoring as a problem until they are told by bed partners or members of a patient’s household that it is disturbing others. At this point, people tend to think of snoring as merely a social problem. But, says Dr. Hébert, snoring is more than an annoyance: it is an alarm signal.

Snoring is a sign that a patient has a breathing problem called obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). OSA can lead to a number of health problems, including heart problems, circulatory problems, strokes, and diabetes. Sleep apnea is a health problem that needs to be treated.

In times past, the treatment for snoring was surgery. But the procedure didn’t work more than 50% of the time. Today, there are more treatment options. One of them is an over-the-counter, generic dental appliance. Dr. Hébert notes that some of them are sold on the Internet. These appliances work for about a third of the people who try them. However, since these appliances are not custom made for a particular patient, they can create other problems, including bite changes and jawbone problems.

The best course for a sleep sufferer to follow is to get a custom-made appliance following a complete examination to make sure that there are no other problems underlying the snoring that need to be dealt with. Then, Dr. Hébert says, he determines the best appliance to help a patient overcome the snoring problem and get back to normal life.

Dr. Jacques Hébert, of Centre Dentaire Fancelli near Montreal in Longueuil, Quebec, Canada, graduated from Laval University in Quebec City in 1981, Dr. Jacques Hébert is a multidisciplinary residency at the Jewish General Hospital in Montreal the following year. His areas of predilection are the joint treatment, cosmetic dentistry and implantology and laser treatments. Dr. Hébert is a graduate of the prestigious Institute for Advanced Dental Dawson Studies in Florida. Sleep Better TV is a featured network of Sequence Media Group.

Thursday
Jul302015

Occlusal Splints, Dentist Dr. Jacques Hébert, Longueil, Montreal, Canada

Because of their stressful lives these days, says Dr. Jacques Hébert, many people are told that they need to have occlusal splints. In this report, Dr. Hébert explains occlusal splints and their uses.

Dr. Hébert says that occlusal splints are made from acrylics and are made to fit over the masticating surfaces of a patient’s teeth. The usual reason a splint is prescribed is to protect against bruxism. An appliance like this should only be worn at night. Dr. Hébert notes that these appliances do not eliminate the pressure caused by teeth clenching. The appliances only protect the teeth.

Dr. Hébert says that there are basically two types of occlusal splints. One type, the one previously described, is the splint designed to protect against bruxism. The other type is an appliance designed for daytime wear, or even 24 hour wear. These appliances are designed to protect against more issues than bruxism. A good diagnosis is important before such appliances are prescribed.

The daytime appliances should not be worn for longer than four months, Dr. Hébert explains. The reason for this is that, after six or seven months of constant use, an appliance like this can lead to changes in the jawbone that affect a patient’s bite. The teeth may no longer close, and that condition can require further treatment. It is possible that the wrong appliance can make a patient’s obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) worse. A patient needs to be checked for OSA before a daytime appliance is prescribed.

Dr. Hébert says that his clinic always does a complete examination of a patient before even a simple nighttime appliance is prescribed. “Everybody needs to have a good appliance, but worn for the right reason.”

Dr. Jacques Hébert, of Centre Dentaire Fancelli near Montreal in Longueuil, Quebec, Canada, graduated from Laval University in Quebec City in 1981, Dr. Jacques Hébert is a multidisciplinary residency at the Jewish General Hospital in Montreal the following year. His areas of predilection are the joint treatment, cosmetic dentistry and implantology and laser treatments. Dr. Hébert is a graduate of the prestigious Institute for Advanced Dental Dawson Studies in Florida. Sleep Better TV is a featured network of Sequence Media Group.

Thursday
Jul302015

Depression and Chronic Pain, Dentist Dr. Jacques Hébert, Longueil, Montreal, Canada

Depression is an increasingly common health problem, says Dr. Jacques Hébert. In this report, he explains the connection between depression and chronic pain.

Dr. Hébert points out that three of the most commonly prescribed medications in North America are antidepressants. There are several different types of depression, including secondary depression. This is a problem caused by a traumatic event, such as the death of a loved one. One of the causes of such depression can be chronic pain.

Dr. Hébert notes that pain is a messenger, telling the body that it has an injury. If the pain is acute, it will heal by itself or with treatment. If the pain is chronic—meaning it has lasted six months or more—the message the body receives is that something is wrong, but the message doesn’t say where the problem is located. Patients suffering from chronic pain may consult physicians and try all kinds of things to solve the problem. These efforts are usually unsuccessful. Such patients are often told that “the problem is in their head” because their physicians can’t find the pain.

Patients who reach that stage will likely develop secondary depression. Dr. Hébert says that he has treated many patients in this situation. Most of them were already taking antidepressant medications. Dr. Hébert has been successful in treating many of these patients. They regain their health and quality of life.

Dr. Jacques Hébert, of Centre Dentaire Fancelli near Montreal in Longueuil, Quebec, Canada, graduated from Laval University in Quebec City in 1981, Dr. Jacques Hébert is a multidisciplinary residency at the Jewish General Hospital in Montreal the following year. His areas of predilection are the joint treatment, cosmetic dentistry and implantology and laser treatments. Dr. Hébert is a graduate of the prestigious Institute for Advanced Dental Dawson Studies in Florida. Sleep Better TV is a featured network of Sequence Media Group.

Thursday
Jun182015

Jaw Noise, Dentist Dr. Michel Fancelli, Longeuil, Quebec, Canada

Many people have jaw clicking or jaw noise. In this report, Dr. Michel Fancelli explains what causes the problem and what can be done to solve it.

When a jaw starts to make noise, it is not a good sign. Dr. Fancelli explains that the jaw consists of the condyle, the fascia, and the disc. The function of the disc is to let the bones function together so that the condyle slides gently into the fascia. When you open your mouth, you may hear a noise of the disc popping back onto the head of the condyle. When you close your mouth, you may hear a second noise indicating that the disc is displaced. “It’s no longer in a good position.”

When that occurs, says Dr. Fancelli, the condyle is very vulnerable to degeneration. When we close our mouth, we put a lot of stress on our jaw. Even though the jaw noise is a sign of something bad, most people will not have jaw pain at the onset of this problem. People may experience problems that they do not immediately associate with the jaw, such as teeth cracking or becoming sensitive to heat and cold. As the problem becomes more advanced, a person might experience changes in bite. A patient might develop headaches, even migraines. Poor sleep is another possibility.

The people most at risk for problems, says Dr. Fancelli, are people who clench or grind their teeth. This usually occurs when they are sleeping. People who have jaw injuries are also at risk. Other candidates are people who have chronic pain or sleep apnea.

The treatment for most people is to simple wear a night guard at night. For those who have more extensive damage, the treatment is more complex

Dr. Michel Fancelli is a dentist practicing with the Centre Dentaire Fancelli near Montreal in Longueuil, Quebec, Canada. Dr. Fancelli completed a multidisciplinary residency at the Montreal Children's Hospital. He has been practicing in Longueuil since 1984. He opened a new state of the art, high technology office in 2002. He completed a residency program at the TMJ and Sleep Therapy Research, an advance training on the management of temporomandibular joint and sleep disorders. The Legal Broadcast Network is a featured network of the Sequence Media Group.