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Dr. Blake Perkins, D.D.S Vancouver, Washington

811 NE 112th Ave Ste 100-A 
Vancouver, WA 98684
(360) 892-7780 
http://bettersleepvancouver.com/

Click Here To Contact Dr. Perkins

Dr. Perkins graduated from Brigham Young University in 1996 with a Bachelors Degree in Conservation Biology. He was then accepted to Case Western Reserve University School of Dentistry, one of the most prestigious dental schools in the country. The United States Air Force took notice of Dr. Perkins and awarded him a Health Professions Scholarship in 1998. After graduating in 2000, Dr. Perkins was accepted into the Air Forces Advanced Education in General Dentistry residency at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, OH. Throughout 2000 and 2001, he practiced under specialists from all areas of dentistry, including Endodontics, Periodontics, Orthodontics, Pediatric Dentistry, and Oral Surgery.

Upon completion of his post-doctoral education, Dr. Perkins served in the Active Duty Air Force at Beale Air Force Base in Northern California as the Base Preventive Dentistry Officer, where he won numerous awards, including Medical Group Company Grade Officer of the Quarter and Medical Operations Squadron Company Grade Officer of the Year. In 2003, he transferred to the Air Force Reserves at McChord Air Force Base in Washington, and returned to start private practice in his hometown of Vancouver, WA. In 2010, Dr. Perkins joined the Air National Guard, and is now the Base Dental Surgeon for the Portland Air National Guard Base, where he continues to proudly serve his country.

Dr. Perkins is continually completing training courses on the latest advances in dentistry so he and his staff can provide you the best dentistry has to offer, combined with the personalized service we all deserve. He is rapidly becoming known as one of Vancouver’s top dentists. He is also Director and CEO of Cascadia Dental Career Institute, Clark Counties first private vocational school for Dental Assistant Training. Now it its 5th year, Cascadia has become known as the place to go for quality vocational training, with dozens of successful graduates enjoying their career in Dentistry!

Dr. Perkins is happily married to his wife Sarah and celebrate their five wonderful children daily. Two of his great loves are the outdoors and teaching youth. His latest hobby is performing as the Lead Vocalist and backup guitar for a local band, Sonic Icebox. Most of all, he loves being a father and husband to his amazing family! He recognizes that he would not be where he is today without each one of them.

Wednesday
Jul152015

Childhood Snoring, Dentist Dr. Blake Perkins, Vancouver, Washington

Some children snore, but this is not a good thing. In this report, Dr. Blake Perkins of Dental Sleep Medicine in Vancouver, Washington explains why childhood snoring is a problem and what parents can do about it.

Dr. Perkins says that it is never “normal” for children to snore. Snoring happens when a person’s airway is blocked for some reason. Tissue in the back of the throat moves around and produces the distinctive sound of snoring. The underlying cause is that something is in the way of a child’s breathing, “and it can’t be good.”

If a child is snoring, parents should first see a physician to see if perhaps the cause is enlarged adenoids or tonsils, or possibly a blockage in the nasal passages forcing mouth breathing. The point of the visit to the doctor is to determine whether any medical condition is causing the snoring.

After that, the child should see a dentist to see if the palate and jaw are growing and developing properly. Any problems in those areas can affect the size of the airway and cause snoring. After getting both medical and dental opinions, parents can decide whether a medical or an orthodontic approach is what is needed.

The surgical procedures to remove tonsils, adenoids, or other tissues are fairly standard procedures, Dr. Perkins explains. Likewise, the orthodontic procedures are common procedures, involving palate expanders or other appliances that can help to encourage a wider airway.

J. Blake Perkins, DDS, is a graduate of Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine. He is the owner of Today's Family Dentistry of Vancouver, Washington, and he is an expert in the treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). He spoke with Sleep Better TV, providing online sleep breathing disorder video news content. Sleep Better TV is a featured network of Sequence Media Group.

Wednesday
Jul152015

Dental Insurance, Dentist Dr. Blake Perkins, Vancouver, Washington

Dentistry can be relatively expensive for some patients. One solution to affording good dental care is dental insurance. In this report, Dr. Blake Perkins of Dental Sleep Medicine in Vancouver, Washington explains how dental insurance works and why it may not be what everyone thinks it will be.

Dr. Perkins notes that dental insurance is a relatively new development compared to medical insurance. Dental insurance really began in the 1960s. The average policy in those days paid about $1,000 and was a fairly simple plan. When you look at today’s dental insurance, you will see that the payout has changed very little: probably $1,000, perhaps as much as $1,500. However today’s plans have more exclusions, more fee schedules, and more general complexity.

Dental insurance is quite a bit different from medical insurance. Dr. Perkins says he has conversations every day about dental insurance, and they are never good conversations. Most people understand how medical insurance works. There’s usually a deductible, and when that is met, the medical insurance will pay a percentage of the cost. The premiums for medical insurance are much higher than for dental insurance.

Dental insurance, on the other hand, is less expensive but covers less. Dr. Perkins says that most people don’t really see dental insurance as a real value because the cost of dentistry is much less than the cost of medicine.

Dr. Perkins says that the best way for someone to understand dental insurance is to realize that it is not there to pay for all dental care. That is the biggest misunderstanding that many people have. “I don’t want to do that if my insurance doesn’t cover it.” This, says Dr. Perkins, is a big mistake.

People understand why the health of their body is important and won’t ignore a serious health problem because it is not insured. But for many people, the body and the teeth don’t seem to be connected. Years ago when health care was developing, dentistry split off from medical care. Dr. Perkins considers this unfortunate, as dental care can be very important to general health. But Dr. Perkins says that things are changing and that a more holistic approach is developing.

Dr. Perkins opines that it would be a good thing if dental plans went away entirely and if health insurance plans covered dental care as well as medical care.

J. Blake Perkins, DDS, is a graduate of Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine. He is the owner of Today's Family Dentistry of Vancouver, Washington, and he is an expert in the treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). He spoke with Sleep Better TV, providing online sleep breathing disorder video news content. Sleep Better TV is a featured network of Sequence Media Group.

Wednesday
Jul152015

Help with Missing Teeth, Dentist Dr. Blake Perkins, Vancouver, Washington

It is not uncommon for a person to lose one or more teeth in the course of a lifetime. But it may be important to find a way to replace a missing tooth. In this report, Dr. Blake Perkins of Dental Sleep Medicine in Vancouver, Washington explains why replacement is important and discusses the available options.

There are several possible consequences to missing a tooth; some are benign, others not so benign. A lost molar in particular reduces one’s ability to chew. Also, in the area where a tooth is lost, the bone can over time form what is called a saddle, a cup-shaped area. The formation of a saddle can make future tooth restoration more difficult.

Also, if a tooth is lost, the teeth on either side of it may tip into the empty space, affecting the bite and creating difficulty for making future repairs. Also, a missing tooth may leave a gap that a tooth in the opposing point in the mouth (above it or below it) will extrude into. This means that the opposing tooth will start to push upward from the jawbone because there is nothing opposite it to keep it where it belongs.

Among the replacement options, Dr. Perkins most favors a dental implant, which will allow a replacement almost as though the original tooth had never been lost. The combination of a titanium screw and a crown make for a very realistic replacement.

If dental implants are not an option, Dr. Perkins suggests a bridge. A bridge is essentially three crowns fused together to fill a missing space. Using a bridge requires the preparation of the teeth on either side of the missing tooth, and that is a downside to this approach. However, once the crowns are cemented into place, it is almost as though a tooth had never been lost.

Another approach is removable partial dentures to fill in the space of the missing tooth (or teeth). It is similar in some ways to a retainer used in orthodontics after a patient has braces It fits over and around teeth to fill the empty space. Dr. Perkins adds that a patient may choose to do nothing, but this is not a recommended choice.

J. Blake Perkins, DDS, is a graduate of Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine. He is the owner of Today's Family Dentistry of Vancouver, Washington, and he is an expert in the treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). He spoke with Sleep Better TV, providing online sleep breathing disorder video news content. Sleep Better TV is a featured network of Sequence Media Group.

Wednesday
Jul152015

Mouth-Body Connection, Dentist Dr. Blake Perkins, Vancouver, Washington

Many of us think of our mouths strictly in dental terms. However, the mouth is part of the body, and the mouth-body connection matters. In this report, Dr. Blake Perkins of Dental Sleep Medicine in Vancouver, Washington explains why good oral hygiene is important to general good health.

Dr. Perkins suggests that we think about the mouth as the gateway to the body. What is going on in the mouth can affect one’s overall health in many ways. Dental problems that are untreated can increase the risk of developing a host of other problems: stroke, heart disease, and diabetes. Dental problems in pregnant women can affect the weight of pre-term babies.

Talking about specific kinds of problems, Dr. Perkins says that people who have periodontal disease double their risk of having some sort of heart disease, including blockage of coronary arteries, heart attack, or even a stroke. The bacteria in the mouth that get into the bloodstream carry proteins that encourage the blood to clot. When you think about the bacteria entering the bloodstream, it is easy to imagine how problems might occur.

Diabetes is another disease that can have a mouth connection. Dr. Perkins says that over 95% of diabetes patients have periodontal disease. About one-third of those people have so much disease that it leads to tooth loss. Because diabetics are more susceptible to infection, the periodontal disease can affect the rest of their bodies. Also, people with periodontal disease have difficulty controlling their blood sugar, a situation that can make diabetes worse.

Respiratory problems can also have a connection to dental problems. If the germs from periodontal disease are able to pass down into the respiratory tract, they can make people more susceptible to pneumonia and more likely to develop colds.

Dr. Perkins suggests that the first line of defense for people is to brush their teeth properly. That is the most important step because the act of brushing teeth removes plaque from the teeth, and plaque is the precursor to the bacteria that can lead to periodontal disease and other problems. Think of the mouth as hotel, he suggests, with rooms for both good and bad bacteria. Letting the bad bacteria run unchecked eliminates rooms for the good bacteria.

J. Blake Perkins, DDS, is a graduate of Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine. He is the owner of Today's Family Dentistry of Vancouver, Washington, and he is an expert in the treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). He spoke with Sleep Better TV, providing online sleep breathing disorder video news content. Sleep Better TV is a featured network of Sequence Media Group.

Wednesday
Jul152015

Children and Dental Care, Dentist Dr. Blake Perkins, Vancouver, Washington

Dental care is important for adults, but children need dental care as well. In this report, Dr. Blake Perkins of Dental Sleep Medicine in Vancouver, Washington explains

Dr. Perkins suggests that children should see dentists about the time their first tooth appears. Parents can learn how to take care of their children’s teeth. The visit can set the stage for a child to have a positive dental experience later.

It is important to prepare a child for the first visit to a dentist. Dr. Perkins says that a parent “can make [the visit] a great experience or . . . absolutely torpedo that experience for the child.” It is important to talk about the visit in a positive way. Parents should let their children know that something exciting is about to happen. Parents should avoid any buzzwords that might scare the child.

What happens on that first visit depends on the child, Dr. Perkins explains. If a child is compliant, as many are, a dentist can take x-rays (if needed), brush the teeth, apply fluoride, floss the teeth, teach the children a little about tooth care, and leave the child smiling. Some children are reluctant to even sit in a dental chair. In a situation like that, the visit is short. The child will learn about a toothbrush, meet the dental hygienist, and plan to come back in a few weeks for a slightly longer visit. Dr. Perkins calls them “happy visits.”

Parents can help out at home by brushing their teeth with their child. Dr. Perkins warns that some parents assume too early that their children have tooth brushing all figured out. In fact, children don’t develop really good brushing dexterity until sometime between ages eight and ten. So parents need to stay on top of the situation and make sure that their children are brushing as they should. Dr. Perkins suggests letting children brush their teeth and then brushing their teeth again with them. Parents should model the kind of brushing they expect from their children. The point is to build it into a good experience for the child.

J. Blake Perkins, DDS, is a graduate of Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine. He is the owner of Today's Family Dentistry of Vancouver, Washington, and he is an expert in the treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). He spoke with Sleep Better TV, providing online sleep breathing disorder video news content. Sleep Better TV is a featured network of Sequence Media Group.